Gloucestershire's Natural Capital

Welcome to the GLNP Natural Capital mapping project

Introduction

 Alpha-testing site: may not always work or even load properly. All part of the plan!

Gloucestershire Local Nature Partnership (GLNP) has been commissioned by Gfirst LEP and Local Authorities to develop full Nature Recovery Network and Ecosystem Services maps for Gloucestershire, including modelling of future opportunities.

Led by Ecosulis and working closely with Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust, Gloucestershire Centre for Environmental Records and other partners, the Project has mapped the spatial distribution of 13 existing ecosystem services on a detailed, 2mx2m grid-square basis. Accompanying these is a set of opportunity layers showing the potential for meeting demand. At the same time, a detailed habitat inventory and Nature Recovery Network have been produced by Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust, using new and existing data from a huge range of sources. The results make up the Gloucestershire Natural Capital Mapping Project, and this website will display the maps as they become available.

Our goal is to help guide land-use and planning decisions, identify opportunities for investment in the enhancement of natural capital in the county and provide a tool for delivering positive, integrated benefits for people, wildlife and the economy.

This website offers GLNP partners and the general public a chance to view and compare the many elements of Gloucestershire's remarkable natural capital. It is a work in progress: please refresh the site often to see the latest available map layers, online tools and data updates.

 About the map layers

 Click a category below to show/hide information about the source, methodology, limitations and conditions of use for each of the available layers:

Description
Version: 1.1 Aug-Sept 2020
Ecosystem services are the benefits provided by ecosystems that enable human populations to live and thrive. A loss of natural capital such as core habitats and healthy soil leads to a loss of associated ecosystem benefits, with adverse impacts for people and wildlife. A serious collapse in ecosystem services may make some areas uninhabitable altogether; a deterioration in ecosystem services, if not lethal, will certainly cause a loss of human quality of life and a more difficult existence.

Repairing or replacing services provided by a healthy environment may prove either impossible or prohibitively expensive. The need to identify, protect and improve these services whilst we still have them is now considered crucial to ensure a resilient and sustainable future for both wildlife and people.

The Gloucestershire Natural Capital Mapping Project has identified thirteen key ecosystem services which we benefit from directly as a result of the county's natural environment. The majority have both a baseline map showing the extent of the existing service, and an opportunity map showing the degree to which a service is being delivered where it is needed. The services fall within four main categories and are derived from a wide range of source data and methodologies. Contact GCER or GLNP for information about how you can obtain or reproduce copies of these maps.

Click on an ecosystem service below for more details:

 Provisioning Services:

 Regulating Services:




 Coming soon:- Cultural Services:




 Bundled supporting benefits:


Description
Version: 1.2 June 2020 (Beta - working draft version)
Nature Recovery Network mapping aims to show the prioritised distribution of opportunities for creating a more resilient network of habitats for people and nature. Four categories are included:

  • Open habitat (core habitat: largely grassland but also some lowland heath)
  • Woodland (core habitat: semi-nature woodland)
  • Arable (coming soon! core habitat: farmland bird and specialist arable plant habitats) and
  • Wetland (core habitat: all open water and wetland habitats). This layer is treated as an overlay to the other categories
Mixed habitats which are hard to define are treated simply as 'Open habitat or Woodland'.

Because of their significance in the County, Traditional Orchards (a Priority Habitat) have here been included as a separate habitat layer. Note that this layer is maintained by the People's Trust for Endangered Species and provided under an Open Government licence via the Natural England Open Data portal under the same conditions of use as other Open Data Portal layers (see the entry for AONBs).
View the Traditional Orchards layer metadata here.

Rationale
Opportunity for the four main habitat categories to be extended into larger and more joined-up networks is calculated using the concept of 'cost distance' - in other words, for a key suite of species typical of the habitat type, how easy is it for those species to spread given that some surrounding areas 'cost' (in ecological terms) more than others to move through? This is then combined with a number of other opportunities and constraints to habitat restoration/creation.

The network thus illustrates both the existing hot-spots of habitat, and also the potential benefits of improving the landscape permeability (reducing the 'cost') to create better networks both for biodiversity and ecosystem services. This is a very complex calculation that isn't always easy to express on a map! However, the NRN layer, although generalized, is still strongly indicative of where the priority opportunities lie for landscape-scale habitat restoration.

Scoring
Areas shown on the NRN map are broken into high, medium and low scores for nature restoration opportunity - plus the existing Priority Habitats which form the core baseline. A high opportunity score will have a bolder colour on the map, and represents the opportunity for 20% coverage of core habitat. A medium opportunity score offers a 10% increase; other areas are classed as low but can still provide opportunities to improve the resilience of the network if the right project is proposed. Importantly, even low-scoring areas may offer a chance to improve the permeability of the wider countryside to species movement.

Core habitat patches from each network are shown here in the same map viewer layer group as the main NRN layers. These are what the networks are built around and the aim is to assure the long term survival of the species associated with these patches. A core habitat patch is an area of contiguous priority habitat (NERC Act section 41 definition) or semi-natural habitat. Patches of habitat are considered contiguous if gaps between them are no greater than 10m.

Source layers
The NRN layer and accompanying Wetland Opportunities and Core Habitats overlays all rely on a detailed habitat inventory of Gloucestershire which is compiled from a wide range of sources. These include Natural England's Priority Habitat Inventory, the latest CEH Land Cover Map, Ordnance Survey MasterMap, Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust's Phase 1 Habitat Survey and other site survey data, and specialist habitat assessments such as the UK National Forest Inventory and the People's Trust For Endangered Species' Traditional Orchards distribution map.

Methods and limitations
Click here to download the technical report.

The NRN map layers should be considered as guidance only as they are generated from best available data and may not always reflect the true picture on the ground. Care should always be taken to prevent degradation of any existing valued habitats, network connections or geological or historical features. They are not a substitute for expert advice but should aid interpretation of priorities.

Future upgrades
The current NRN layer is a 'beta' version which lacks the final habitat category - Arable habitats. This category is of particular importance for farmland birds and arable plants, but hasn't been assessed fully during 2020 due to Covid-19 related farm survey restrictions. Future NRN layer versions will include core Arable habitats, an updated NRN layer and any major updates to other underlying habitat inventory data.

Data uses and restrictions
Image extracts from this website may be made (eg by utilising the 'Save image' tool) and used in reports provided Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust and Gloucestershire Local Natural Partnership are attributed, along with the version number of the underlying map. Raw GIS data may not be copied or made use of without first agreeing authorisation from GWT, as it contains licensed, proprietary data (see the main Acknowledgements tab).

Description
Version date: July 2020
The existing connectivity of the woodland and the open habitats networks are modelled using the concept of 'cost distance' – for each of the two ecological networks an ecological ‘cost’ to movement through the landscape is assigned to every habitat or land use type. This then adjusts the allocated dispersal distance of a generic, model species, where: allocated dispersal distance / ‘cost’ = distance moved into the landscape.

The layers illustrate a number of different dispersal distances for each ecological network to indicate the existing level of connectivity for different species groups.

The lowest (500m) dispersal distance illustrates the core network, as 500m or less is considered to be applicable to the dispersal limitations of many invertebrates, vascular and lower plants on which ecosystems are built.

Source layers
See NRN above.

Methods and limitations
Click here to download the technical report.

This is a very generalised illustration of existing connectivity to give an idea of functional connectivity for generalist species that can be viewed at a county scale. If particular species are being targeted you should run the analysis using parameters specific to those species - see the technical report for how to approach this.

Future upgrades
The habitat connectivity layers rely on our underlying knowledge of Gloucestershire habitats. Major changes to the habitat inventory are likely to result in updates to the connectivity map; please check the version date when comparing maps.

Description
Version date: July 2020
Resilience is the ability to bounce back from or adapt to a challenge or disturbance. Here is displayed two simple measures of resilience:

  1. Core habitat patch size
  2. Area of core habitat within a core network
In general, the smaller the accessible area of suitable habitat, the fewer the species able to survive within that area because each species requires a ‘minimum viable area’ of habitat to meet its needs. Research and expert opinion provide some thresholds for minimum viable areas of individual habitat patches (illustrated by measure 1) and functionally connected networks of habitat patches (illustrated by measure 2).

If a habitat patch or network is below the minimum threshold, it is unlikely to survive with a full suite of species long-term, i.e. it is not resilient, and extinctions will occur.

Source layers
See NRN above.

Methods and limitations
Click here to download the technical report.

This is a very generalised illustration of resilience to give an idea of priorities at a county scale to guide project planning. If particular species are being targeted the analysis will need to be run using parameters specific to those species.

Other measures of resilience detailed in the technical report are available for the data on request, though they may be chargeable.

User guidance
Different user groups will need to use the mapping in different ways to answer their particular needs. For this reason, guidance tailored to different user groups is likely to be available from the following:

  • Local Planning Authorities and the planning process
  • Environmental Land Management System (ELMS), organisations’ or individuals’ land management planning
  • Landscape-scale nature recovery project planning
  • Woodland creation or expansion plans

Future upgrades
As with the connectivity data, the habitat resilience layers rely on our underlying knowledge of Gloucestershire habitats. Major changes to the habitat inventory are likely to result in updates to the resilience patch metrics and hence the map; please check the version date when comparing maps.

Description
Version date: September 2020
Areas scheduled by Historic England include archaeological sites, a wide range of ancient monuments, parks and gardens and sites of historic battles. Note that not all notable parkland in Gloucestershire is 'listed'; parkland also features on the core woodland habitat layers as it is a Priority Habitat in its own right. In many cases a site of interest will have more than one reason for its importance: some sites in the historic features layer may also be of interest for geological or biological features.

Data uses and restrictions
The Scheduled Ancient Monument, Battlefield and Parks and Gardens layers are freely available from Historic England's GIS data download page. Historic England request that an attribution is always included with their data; an example attribution, and other licencing and metadata information, is included with each download from their downloads page.

Version date: August 2020
County, District and Parish boundaries are derived from the Ordnance Survey Data Hub Boundary-Line product. Usage is covered by an Open Government Licence; the boundary dataset is free for anyone to use.

Version date: September 2020
This layer is freely available from Natural England's Open Data Hub
View the metadata document here.
As with the administrative boundaries, AONB outlines are free to download and use.

Description
Version 2.2: December 2016
Nature Improvement Areas (NIAs) resulted from a Natural Environment White Paper in which Defra set out a vision for a suite of landscape-scale initiatives. The aim of NIAs is to ensure that land is used sustainably to achieve multiple benefits for people, wildlife and the local economy. In addition to 12 NIAs of national status, areas may be decided locally wherever the opportunities or benefits are greatest, driven by the knowledge and vision of local partners. This was the case in Gloucestershire, where the Gloucestershire Local Nature Partnership agreed 5 NIAs:

  • Forest of Dean
  • Severn Vale
  • Cotswold Scarp
  • Cotswold Valleys
  • Cotswold Water Park

The NIA layer consists of simple outlines for each NIA; click on an area to see its name and basic details.

Future upgrades
Gloucestershire's NIAs are likely to develop alongside the Nature Recovery Network to form a framework for effective landscape-scale projects. They may be amended or extended in future, or incorporated into nature recovery areas based on Nature Recovery Network models.

Data uses and restrictions
The NIA map layer is free to use for any purpose; please always include the relevant version number and a GLNP attribution.

Description
Version 1.1: December 2011
The combined Strategic Nature Areas which make up Gloucestershire Nature Map are the result of a process undertaken in 2007-2008. The aim of Nature Map was to find a strategic approach to showing the best places to maintain and extend terrestrial habitats at a county scale. It is a refined version of the South West Nature Map and is a detailed local vision for natural environment change.

SNA mapping is based on the inclusion of selected areas of value sitting within locations where the natural environment could be enhanced or restored. It does not include every area of importance for biodiversity such as designated sites, protected landscapes and priority habitats but it has taken the distribution of these into account.

Click here for more information

Future upgrades
Gloucestershire Nature Map formed the basis for the current Nature Improvement Areas; these effectively replace the SNAs as a tool for deciding areas for nature restoration, and are likely to develop alongside the Nature Recovery Network to form a framework for effective landscape-scale projects.

Data uses and restrictions
The Nature Map SNAs layer is free to use for any purpose; please always include the relevant version number and a GLNP attribution.

Disclaimer

Information displayed on this map viewer is subject to the limitations of the source data, which occasionally may be amended, updated or replaced. Gloucestershire Local Nature Partnership provides the maps in good faith but cannot guarantee accuracy. Note that the Ecosystem Services and Nature Recovery Network layers are both the result of data modelling and should be viewed as indicative rather than precise.

To read about the rationale and limitations of the map layers, click on Info > Map metadata and check the background details for each map layer group.

We are indebted to a range of code, data and hosting resources which have enabled us to develop the Project and website. Click a topic below for acknowledgements and links to related sources:

The Gloucestershire Natural Capital Mapping Project has benefited from a range of existing research and programming resources, including:

Note that GLNP and GCER do not control the sources of our online background maps ; please let us know if any of the following layers has stopped working or is too slow to use. Our map viewer uses free online mapping from the following providers:

Detailed Ordnance Survey mapping is used under the following licences:

  • Ordnance Survey MasterMap vector data (forms part of some of the ecological modelling datasets) is sub-licenced from Gloucestershire County Council under PSMA licence no. 100019134
  • Ordnance Survey VectorMap Local 1:10000 scale raster data (detailed background maps) business licence no. 0100046783
  • Ordnance Survey Data Hub Premium vector tile mapping (this is the 'detailed Ordnance Survey map' in the Special Basemaps list)
Please note that Ordnance Survey OpenData along with the other free online mapping resources listed above are free to use via a straightforward online account API, but licensed OS data may not be copied by third parties; to replicate those maps you would require a separate OS licence and/or API key. Please get in touch with GLNP if you would like to reproduce any of our map data in any way, as some layers contain licenced Ordnance Survey data and/or other proprietary data sources.

Website

This website has been designed and developed by Gloucestershire Centre for Environmental Records, using a mix of open source web framework, server and GIS software. This enables us to benefit from free, up to date online mapping using well-established standards. In view of the huge community effort that goes into maintaining this open source mapping resource we would particularly like to acknowledge the following:

Hosting

The Gloucestershire Natural Capital Mapping Project website and associated Geoserver are hosted on an AcuGIS server with cloud storage provided by UKFast. Both have been generous with their support. The tailor-made Mapbox styles are hosted on a free Mapbox Studio account.

Gloucestershire Local Nature Partnership
Conservation Centre
Robinswood Hill Country Park
Reservoir Road
Gloucester
GL4 6SX

GLNP Manager: Matt Whitney
email: matt@gloucestershirenature.org.uk


Twitter: @glosnature

Provisioning Services: Food provision

download Food Provision map details

This service covers agricultural and horticultural production of food products via arable crops, livestock, vegetables, and fruits, plus land which provides hunting and/or gathering of food.

This is a relational map layer, ie the underlying ecosystem services, derived from the habitat inventory, are modified by other data in order to provide a more relevant food provision score. The modifying data is the Agricultural Land Classification. Only a baseline layer is currently available: areas with high existing food provision service show darker on the map.

The source data for the modifying layer is Natural England's Agricultural Land Classification dataset (2020). Thus areas with appropriate habitat will score higher if the agricultural land classification is high, less if the classification is low. There are some limitations to the current version: for example, the Agricultural Land Classification is very generalised, and the underlying habitat inventory doesn't always take land management regimes into account. This, and the construction of a Food Provision Opportunities map layer, may be addressed in future if suitable datasets are available.

For a full map descriptor sheet with more details, modifier scores and references, click the download button above.

Provisioning Services: Water supply

download Water Supply map details

This service covers the extent to which surface flow and groundwater recharge are impacted by soils and vegetation through processes of run-off and filtration.

This service has both a baseline and an opportunity map. The baseline map is non-relational, relying on the habitat inventory. The opportunities map is relational, ie the underlying ecosystem services, derived from the habitat inventory, are modified by other data in order to provide a more relevant water supply opportunity score. The modifying data is the Environment Agency’s (2020) Water Resource Availability and Abstraction Reliability Cycle 2 dataset -used as a proxy for water supply.

Limitations to the maps are chiefly due to lack of suitable modifying data. For example, climate and local precipitation levels, or geology and aquifer location. Thus the baseline map has no modifying data, and the opportunities map is modified only by estimated (modelled) water resource availability on a broad scale. Future updates might benefit from quantitative data for these and other spatial factors which might affect water supply.

For a full map descriptor sheet with more details, modifier scores and references, click the download button above.

Regulating Services: Carbon storage

download Carbon Storage map details

This service covers the quantities of carbon stored in soil and vegetation (rather than 'carbon sequestration', the ability of habitat to actively sequester carbon over time, which may be addressed in future Ecosystem Services updates).

This service has both a baseline and an opportunity map. Both maps are non-relational, relying on the habitat inventory. They are thus inverted versions of each other - high baseline scores are treated as low opportunity scores and vice versa. The rationale for not selecting a modification layer for the Carbon Storage baseline or opportunity map was (i) the absence of an available dataset that could be used as a spatial modifier for the ecosystem service and (ii) the complexity of interaction between a habitat’s spatial configuration and its ability to store carbon.

Limitations to the maps are chiefly due to lack of knowledge of the full role of each habitat type as a carbon store, particularly wetland, which may be under-represented compared with woodland. Future updates will take advantage of the latest research and may result in more accurate eco-metric evaluation and representation of all habitats throughout the score.

For a full map descriptor sheet with more details, modifier scores and references, click the download button above.

Regulating Services: Water flow regulation

download Water Flow Regulation map details

This service comprises the impact of soil and vegetation on reducing surface run-off, peak flow, and flood extent and depth. Mechanisms include interception, evapotranspiration, infiltration, and physical water flow slowing. It is therefore the ecosystem service commonly associated with flood risk and flood alleviation planning.

Water Flow Regulation has both a baseline and an opportunity map. Both maps are relational, relying on modifying datasets in addition to the habitat inventory. The modifier layer for the baseline map consists of the intersection of habitats from the Gloucestershire Habitat Inventory with flow pathways generated from a 25m-resolution Digital Elevation Model (European Environment Agency, 2016) of the county.

For the opportunity map, flow pathways, flow pathway nodes, and the Water Flow Regulation Baseline layer, were entered into the model. The baseline input was ‘inverted’ by subtracting each value from the maximum in the dataset. Cost analysis was used to calculate cumulative flood risk of cells intersecting flow pathways from outlet to source. The cumulative flood risk values were split into deciles to produce a 10-point score used to modify baseline values. The line vector data was converted to distinct polygons for each decile using Voronoi polygons, defined from the vertices of the flow pathways. These polygons were then dissolved to produce one polygon per decile, and the polygons rasterised as per the multiplier values.

Limitations to the maps related to the precision of the digital elevation model which formed part of the modifying data; at 25cm it was not the highest resolution data available, but full coverage of better data is not yet available for all of Gloucestershire, only parts.

The flow pathway intersection completed for the baseline layer does not account for position of an intersecting habitat within the catchment. This may be completed through a cost analysis of the flow pathways from outlet to source; this would act as a proxy for measuring the position of each cell within a pathway from the pathway’s outlet. Climate change is also not factored into the flood risk data used here but should be considered as flood risk data is updated to include modelled climate change impacts.

For a full map descriptor sheet with more details, modifier scores and references, click the download button above.

Regulating Services: Local climate regulation

download Climate Regulation map details

This service provides the cooling effects of vegetation and water, in particular in urban areas where these can reduce heating and cooling costs and provide areas of shade.

Climate regulation has both a baseline and an opportunity map. The baseline map is non-relational, relying on the habitat inventory. The opportunity map is relational only so far as excluding areas which fell outside of 250m of an urban area (as calculated from Ordnance Survey maps). Opportunities are thus limited to built-up areas, creating a map of likely demand.

Limitations to the maps are chiefly due to lack of adequate mapping for some key features, for example street trees. There is also a need to take into account the enhanced role of habitats in or near urban heat areas, a factor which isn't well understood at present. Future versions of the maps might also take into account the connection between demand for local climate regulation, particularly cooling, and density of residential areas.

For a full map descriptor sheet with more details, modifier scores and references, click the download button above.

Regulating Services: Air pollutant removal

download Air Pollutant Removal map details

This service covers the effect of vegetation on concentrations of air pollutants through mechanisms including deposition, absorption, and chemical breakdown.

Air pollutant removal has both a baseline and an opportunity map. The baseline map is non-relational, relying on the habitat inventory; a score was assigned based on removal of general air pollutants rather than for each specific pollutants. The opportunity map is relational, taking into account both the inverse of the baseline map and the proximity to urban areas and major roads. Highest-scoring opportunity areas are therefore closest to heavy traffic emissions and lacking in existing helpful habitats.

The maps make some assumptions and have some limitations. It has been assumed that national and regional roads and urban areas are the major sources of air pollution within Gloucestershire. However, there are likely to be other sources – both point and diffuse – that have not been accounted for in this analysis. These may include nitrogen emissions from arable land and point source emissions from industrial sources. These could be included in future analysis, should suitable data be available.

The value used to determine the buffer distance from roads and urban areas is based on values from nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions; the behaviour of other atmospheric pollutants (e.g. carbon dioxide) is likely to vary. Future work could account for this by allocating pollutants to each source and producing a buffer value from these sources based on the specific pollutants. More than one set of maps could improve the usefulness of the current datasets.

As with Local Climate Regulation, demand for air pollutant removal is greatest in residential areas. Future work will, if availability of data allows, consider classifying urban areas to broad classes (e.g. commercial, industrial, residential) to recognise variations in demand for the air pollutant removal within urban areas. Population density may also be used as a proxy for this.

For a full map descriptor sheet with more details, modifier scores and references, click the download button above.

Cultural Services: Recreation

Cultural Services use different calculations to the other suite of Ecosystem Service maps; maps and accounts coming soon.

Cultural Services: Education

Cultural Services use different calculations to the other suite of Ecosystem Service maps; maps and accounts coming soon.

Cultural Services: Interaction with nature

Cultural Services use different calculations to the other suite of Ecosystem Service maps; maps and accounts coming soon.

Cultural Services: Sense of place

Cultural Services use different calculations to the other suite of Ecosystem Service maps; maps and accounts coming soon.

Bundled benefits: Biodiversity

download Biodiversity map details

This natural capital 'bundled benefit' comprises the ability of a habitat to support a diverse range of species, providing a variety of environmental, social, and economic benefits. These layers should be viewed in conjunction with the original Gloucestershire Nature Recovery Network.

Biodiversity has both a baseline and an opportunity map. Both maps are relational, with both the underlying habitat inventory and other factors being taken into account for scoring. For the baseline biodiversity map, the Nature Recovery Network and associated habitat connectivity was used as a modifier. For the opportunity layer, the Nature Recovery Network was likewise used as a modifier, along with potential connectivity gains and a blanket category of existing Priority Habitats. Thus the areas of highest opportunity are darkest/warmest on the map, but existing (assumed low opportunity) Priority Habitats are highlighted rather than given the usual low opportunity colour.

The Biodiversity maps have the benefit of all the research and modelling that went into the Nature Recovery Network (NRN). However, The NRN is currently in development, so these derived layers should be updated periodically as the NRN is updated.

For a full map descriptor sheet with more details, modifier scores and references, click the download button above.

Bundled benefits: Water quality

This natural capital 'bundled benefit' comprises the uptake of pollutants dissolved or suspended in water by vegetation, and the ability of vegetation to prevent pollutants reaching waterbodies through interception and filtration.

The water quality map account is in draft form and will be uploaded shortly.

Bundled benefits: Soil health

This natural capital 'bundled benefit' comprises the continued capacity of soil to function as a vital living ecosystem that sustains plants, animals, and humans.

The soil health map account is in draft form and will be uploaded shortly.

Using the map viewer

This website is designed to show as much of the maps as possible without intrusive lists and popups. Access the maps, tools and information you need from the buttons:


Tips:
The blank or the 'Carto Light' basemaps may help with viewing coloured overlay layers

The 'top' layer on the map is the one which was added most recently. Layers underneath can't be clicked on for an information popup until the layer above is turned off

Some map layers have download links to further information, e.g. methodology documents. These links may be found in the relevant Map Metadata info tab.

Please note that copying and/or redistribution of some layers may be restricted by licence - see the Info>Map Metadata tab for individual Conditions of Use.

Key to map layers

Baseline layer scoring

 Low ecosystem service provision

 ------- High ecosystem service provision

 Areas with a zero score are white


Baseline Ecosystem Service map notes
Zero score areas are usually those excluded by the calculations, eg. Recreation baseline areas where there is no land access, Recreation opportunity areas which already fulfil four ANGSt distance criteria, and any opportunity areas where no demand for a service has been identified.

Ecosystem Service layers are 'coverage' layers: you can only view one baseline layer at a time (round layer list buttons), but you can add more than one overlay (any layer with a square checkbox).
Clickable: no
Opportunity layer scoring

 Low demand/opportunity for improvement

 --- High demand/opportunity for improvement

The B1: Biodiversity Opportunity layer has an extra colour:
 Existing Priority Habitat


Ecosystem Service Opportunity map notes
Like the ES baseline maps, these are 'coverage' layers: you can only view one ES opportunity layer at a time (round layer list buttons), but you can add more than one overlay (any layer with a square checkbox).
Clickable: no
Nature Recovery Network
Combined nature recovery opportunity scores
Clickable: no, except for the Wetland overlay
  • Existing Priority Habitat
  • Woodland: High Priority
  • Woodland: Medium Priority
  • Woodland: Low Priority
  • Open habitats: High Priority
  • Open habitats: Medium Priority
  • Open habitats: Low Priority
  • Open habitat or woodland: High Priority
  • Open habitat or woodland: Medium Priority
  • Open habitat or woodland: Low Priority
  • Wetland opportunity areas (overlay)
Core habitats
Existing core habitat areas
Clickable: yes
  • Core woodland habitats
  • Core open habitats
  • Core wetland habitats
  • Traditional Orchards
Connectivity
Habitat networks at different connectivity distances
Clickable: yes
  • Woodland 10km connectivity
  • Woodland 5km connectivity
  • Woodland 1km connectivity
  • Woodland 500m connectivity
  • Open habitat 5km connectivity
  • Open habitat 1km connectivity
  • Open habitat 500m connectivity
Habitat patch viability
Size categories of existing, continuous core habitat patches
Clickable: yes
  • Core woodland patches less than 1.5ha
  • Core woodland 1.5-5ha
  • Core woodland 5-10ha
  • Core woodland 10-20ha
  • Core woodland 20-100ha
  • Core woodland patches over 100ha
  • Core open habitat patches less than 1ha
  • Core open habitat 1-3ha
  • Core open habitat 3-5ha
  • Core open habitat 5-30ha
  • Core open habitat patches over 30ha
Network viability
Network patches by amount of core habitat in each patch
Clickable: yes
  • under 40ha of core woodland
  • 40-100ha of core woodland
  • over 100ha of core woodland
  • under 10ha of core open habitat
  • 10-30ha of core open habitat
  • 30-50ha of core open habitat
  • 50-70ha of core open habitat
  • over 70ha of core open habitat
Historic Features
Registered historic sites from Historic England
Clickable: yes
  • Scheduled Ancient Monuments
  • Parks and Gardens
  • Battlefields
Admin and strategic boundaries
Clickable: yes
  • Counties
  • Districts
  • Parishes
  • AONBs
  • Nature Improvement Areas
  • Strategic Nature Areas:
  • SNA: Coastal and floodplain grazing marsh
  • SNA: Coastal and floodplain grazing marsh with traditional orchards
  • SNA: Limestone grassland
  • SNA: Lowland meadows
  • SNA: Lowland meadows with traditional orchards
  • SNA: Woodland mosaic
  • SNA: Woodland mosaic with traditional orchards
  • SNA: Woodland mosaic, heathland and acid grassland
  • SNA: Woodland mosaic, heathland, acid grassland and traditional orchards

Open Cycle Map
A key to the types of cycle route is available:
https://www.opencyclemap.org/docs/